NYC in Color, Part 3

The last batch of photos in this series (the first two parts are here and here).

Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200

NYC in Color, Part 2

A few more shots of lower Manhattan from the recalcitrant Voigtländer Vito (full explanation here).

Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200

Making the Best of a Bad Situation

A couple months back I was in NYC for the weekend. My intent was to head downtown and shoot some pictures; I tend to spend more time in midtown, so I expected this to be fertile new ground. I had my Ciro-flex TLR loaded with Efke 100 hanging around my neck, and my Voigtländer Vito with Kodak Gold 200 in my pocket.

The Ciro-flex worked fine. It was the first time I’d shot with a TLR in the city, so it was always going to be a learning experience, but that was expected. Not much of great interest came from the roll (I posted the frame I was happiest with here earlier), but it taught me a bit about street shooting with this format, and the film and lens combo suited the subject nicely.

The Voigtländer, perhaps feeling slighted by its relegation to a pocket, decided to act up. The frame spacing, a weak point on this camera due to the delicacy of the gearing and the use of a feeler spindle instead of a sprocket, started going wonky. Even in ideal circumstances, the frames are always close together; now they were well and truly running into each other. I knew something was up when I was using the camera, but I couldn’t see just how bad it was until I got the film developed.

On the plus side, the color was good. I really love the unique look of Gold 200 with uncoated lenses – bright colors are highly saturated, but more subdued areas stay subdued. Too bad many of the frames were compromised by the overlapping. Nonetheless, I was pleased enough with what remained that I was determined to make something of it. So I started cropping.

I’m not opposed to cropping. Sometimes the photo is just a lot better with less stuff in it. Here, though, the need was more to see how much I could preserve, not how much I could discard. For the most part, what I ended up with was square (or close to square) frames. No problem – I like squares. Sure, it’s not so common to turn 35mm into squares, but it was that or nothing, so squares it is.

Here’s a few from that roll. As you’ll see, they’re all about the color. I’ll post some more over the course of the week. Enjoy.

Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200
Voigtländer Vito, Kodak Gold 200