On Choosing Films

For all the doom and gloom one reads about the death of film, it just isn’t the case. Rather, the film world is in flux. Major producers are either cutting the number of film products or have closed up shop entirely, while smaller producers are emerging to supply the remaining demand. This is the way market-driven economics work.

So even though the selection available for a film photographer to choose from is not what it once was, there’s still enough that decisions have to be made. And those decisions are not always easy.

Let’s look at black-and-white first. There are three major players – Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji – and some smaller ones as well producing the common formats. Available speeds range from 25 up to 3200 (the latter being push-process; true speed closer to 1000 or so). Emulsions utilizing both traditional grain and finer tabular grain are available in multiple speeds, and chromogenic films that develop in C-41 chemistry are available in 400 speed. You call that a lack of choice?

The real problem is selecting one as your go-to film. There’s much to be said for experimentation with different emulsions, but ultimately it’s probably a good idea to settle on one or two for regular use, at least if your intention is to get the best possible images. This is particularly true if you do your own developing, as each film requires its own technique to get the most out of it. It doesn’t help that the vast majority of modern film stocks are quite tolerant, with good latitude, capable of nice tones, and with few annoying quirks.

So what do you want? Fast or slow? Multi-purpose or specialized? Traditional, T-grain, or chromogenic? And most importantly – and most difficult to nail down – what look are you after? Each film has its own character, and each photographer will have a preference (or likely more than one, depending on circumstances). The only way to figure out what you like is to try a bunch of different types and see how they turn out. This will be time-consuming, laborious, and potentially costly. Hey, you could always go digital….

After a fair bit of fooling around, I’m settling into Kodak’s Tri-X as my basic B&W film choice. It’s a traditional grain film, so it retains the characteristic look I prefer. Most of my cameras are old, and I like my photos to reflect the equipment; T-grain films generally look a little too modern for my taste. I haven’t worked out my slower speed choice fully yet, but right now it’s down to three: Ilford’s Pan F+ or FP4+, or Kentmere’s 100 (all three are Harman products). I’ve had good results with all of them, which doesn’t make it any easier.

But we’re not done yet – Fuji’s Acros is a T-grain film that also happens to have excellent reciprocity characteristics (meaning it doesn’t mind long exposures), making it perfect for pinhole photography. So when the pinhole cameras come out, they get Acros – the finer grain doesn’t bother me in this application, given the overall softness of pinhole images. I have also determined one other specialized use for T-grain B&W: half-frame cameras. The smaller frame benefits significantly from the sharpness and clarity possible with these films.

Color negative is a little easier, if for no other reason than that there are fewer readily-available choices. Only Kodak and Fuji are playing here, and they’ve both narrowed their offerings down pretty significantly: each offers consumer films in 200 and 400 (in addition, Fuji offers an 800), and professional films in 400 (Kodak has the clear edge here, offering 100, 160, and 800 as well). Still, though, there are plenty of differences. Both manufacturers have their own distinctive color palettes, and Kodak’s Ektar looks vastly different than their Portra line. The consumer films are far cheaper, but the grain is larger and the images look more old-fashioned (for want of a better characterization).

Again, the question is what look you’re after, and how much you’re willing to pay for it. In color moreso than in black-and-white, you pay a lot more for the professional quality films. Thus, for general shooting, I’ll tend to stick with the consumer films. I prefer Kodak’s colors to Fuji’s – Kodak films tend to be more saturated (especially the reds) and a little warmer. I’ve had better results with the 200 speed offerings from both than I have with the faster options, but they’re all serviceable. I particularly like the way the Kodak Gold 200 works with uncoated lenses.

The jump to professional color emulsions is huge. The grain almost disappears, the colors assume more subtle gradations, and for the Portra films in particular the tolerance goes way up (Ektar is far less able to deal with exposure errors). This is where color film really shows its stuff. In any situation that demands the best possible color images, there is no question that professional films are worth the cost.

My choice here is simpler. Kodak’s Portra line, and specifically the 160 speed, is my go-to 35mm color for serious shooting. The colors are a bit subdued at times, but usually strike a really nice balance. Oddly, though, where the palette works well for me in 35mm, it seems far more neutral – almost washed out – in 120. So for medium format I have settled on Ektar, which provides a more saturated look, especially with the uncoated lens on my Rolleiflex. Oddly, I like Ektar for half-frame as well – like the T-grain B&W films, the super fine grain of Ektar allows you to get the most out of the small negative (though Portra will work just fine here as well).

Your Humble Filmosaur, in spite of being rather opinionated and not at all unwilling to share said opinions, is not in any way suggesting that these choices are right for everyone. Quite frankly, they aren’t even always right for me. Instead, my purpose here is simply to suggest that anyone who shoots film these days has enough choices available that some real thought needs to be put into just what films to choose if they want to maintain as much control over their photos as possible. And the only way to find answers here is to do the research for yourself.

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day Results

Well, the results of the great Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day experiment are in. Your Humble Filmosaur was part of a group of pinhole photographers that met at the B&H store in NYC before heading out to the Hell’s Kitchen Flea Market to take some pictures. Most of those assembled had mounted pinhole caps to their various Nikon DSLRs, which was all well and good, I suppose, but somehow being able to crank up the ISO to 12800 in order to shorten the shutter times and induce noise (NOT grain) seems antithetical to the whole “keep it simple” mindset of pinhole photography. But anyway….

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100

I shot a single roll of Fuji Acros; two frames before we arrived and the remainder together with the group. Watching as everyone set up their tripods at the entrance to the flea market presented an interesting sort of sociology lesson: New Yorkers will apparently take great interest in half a dozen people setting up cameras even though there is nothing remarkable at all going on, but the aging Iggy Pop-lookalike in the pink bikini and matching cowboy hat is completely ignored by everyone.

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100

While I did meter most of my exposures (I think), I seem to have blown out a lot of the highlights. It was a very bright day and, if I’m honest, I was not fully focused on trying to nail the exposure. Pinhole photography is a rather imperfect science, and the imperfections are part of the charm, if you ask me. (How’s THAT for rationalizing?)

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Fuji Acros 100

It was a good time, and it was nice to see others interested in trying a new type of photography, though somehow the idea of sticking a pinhole plate on a DSLR that cost as much as a car still seems a bit absurd to me. Nevertheless, Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day has come and gone, and I was there and have the pictures to prove it.

Particularly Pleasing Practice Pinhole Pictures, Part 2

As promised, here is a second set of pinhole shots in advance of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day; same roll of Kodak Ektar, same pinhole-converted Brownie Flash Six-20 camera. The first set can be found here.

I was pretty happy with the way the shadows held up on these, particularly in terms of the edge detail. Granted, these were hard shadows in bright sunlight, but I was a bit surprised that a pinhole still rendered small, complex shapes relatively clearly. Look at the decorative shapes on the top of the fence as an example.

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar

You can’t see it very well in the scaled-down full frame below, but in the full-size scan the shadows of the individual slats that make up the backs of the chairs are distinct against the wall of the house. The big 6×9 negatives are a major factor, I’m sure (I’m quite skeptical that you’d anything like this much detail from a similar pinhole setup on a standard 35mm negative).

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar

Here’s a crop of the detail. You can even make out the millwork on the rail posts. (Sorry for the dusty scan; I didn’t have time to clean them up, and the dust doesn’t show in the scaled-down versions.)

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar

With all this talk about sharpness and detail (which is really a bit silly; if one really wanted sharp, detailed photos, a pinhole camera would be pretty low on the list or preferred equipment), I would be remiss if I didn’t include this last shot. It was the last on the roll, and shot directly into the light. Apparently this can produce a weird rainbow tie-dye effect as the light passes through the aperture. I’m sure I couldn’t repeat this if I tried.

Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar
Kodak Brownie Flash Six-20 Pinhole Conversion, Kodak Ektar

That’s all the practice I’m going to get before Sunday, so we’ll see how it goes. Happy pinholing!