More Vintage Sports Cars at Lime Rock

OK, I’ll admit I’ve been slacking around here lately – hey, it’s summer, and it’s not like you’re paying for this. Anyway, as the result of some misguided sense of obligation, I’m providing a rare two-post day. Following on the runaway success of the first post in this series, I give you the monochrome shots from the same day shooting the VSCCA races up at Lime Rock Park.

In addition to the Leica, I had my Canon L1, on which I had mounted either the Voigtländer Color Skopar 21/4 or the Nikkor 135/3.5, representing the most extreme ends of my available LTM focal length spectrum. I’d shot races with the Nikkor before, and it works well in that role, but the 21 was an experiment. I wanted to play with distorted perspectives a bit to see what I could get; the answer was a lot of mediocrity, with one or two moderately interesting shots thrown in. I’m still trying to figure out how to get the most out of wide lenses.

Canon L1, Voigtländer Color Skopar 21/4, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Canon L1, Voigtländer Color Skopar 21/4, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Canon L1, Nikkor 135/3.5, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Canon L1, Nikkor 135/3.5, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Canon L1, Voigtländer Color Skopar 21/4, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Canon L1, Voigtländer Color Skopar 21/4, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)

I also shot some black-and-white in the Leica, naturally. It was a bright day with some clouds, as you can see, and I continue to be impressed with how FP4+ performs. It’s quickly becoming my standard film for a lot of applications.

Leica IIIc, Leitz Summitar 50/2, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Leica IIIc, Leitz Summitar 50/2, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)

And finally, probably my favorite shot of the day. It’s blurry, and the exposure’s probably a little off, but I love the lines and it captures more of the atmosphere of the event than any other shot I took.

Leica IIIc, Leitz Summitar 50/2, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)
Leica IIIc, Leitz Summitar 50/2, Ilford FP4+ in Caffenol C-H(RS)

2013: A Filmosaur Retrospective

Well, another year has been muddled through, so it only seems appropriate to look back at it before moving on inexorably into the unknown. Unlike the year prior (chronicled here), 2013 saw a fair bit of film exposed, with a commensurate reduction in digital photography. This was due, in no small part, to having acquired more film cameras and other related equipment; the pile is edging ever closer to unmanageable. Also adding impetus to the film side of things is the fact that I started developing traditional black-and-white film myself, which makes it quicker and cheaper to shoot.

But ultimately, the increased volume of film was down to the fact that I find I prefer not just the end result, but the process of shooting film. There is far too great a temptation to blast away with digital, not to think sufficiently about what you’re shooting and how you’re shooting it, that it can all be sorted and fixed later. For as many good photos as you might capture with this method, you won’t improve your shooting technique one iota; for as many good photos as you might miss working with film, if you’re paying attention to your work, you’ll likely still improve over time. So with that in mind, this little retrospective will be an all-film affair, highlighting what I thought were some of my best shots of the year that never made it to Filmosaur. I’ve been squirreling them away until the time was right – saving the best for last and all that.

Canon P, Nikkor Q.C. 135/3.5, Kodak Gold 400
Canon P, Nikkor Q.C. 135/3.5, Kodak Gold 400
Canon P, Jupiter-8 50/2, Kodak Tri-X
Canon P, Jupiter-8 50/2, Kodak Tri-X

One of the perils of an expanding camera collection is that it becomes increasingly difficult to decide what to use. Thankfully, once you’ve tried a bunch of cameras, you start to realize what works for you. For me, first on the list is my Canon P. Not surprisingly, it got a lot of work this year. I bought it in anticipation of a trip to Europe in the summer, and it performed quite well there and afterwards. Much of the work you saw here over the last year was shot with it, and trend which I’m sure will continue.

Rollei 35, Kentmere 100
Rollei 35, Kentmere 100

But we can’t neglect the others. When I took my Rollei 35 out a few months ago, I was reminded just how much I enjoy that little thing. Great lens, solid build, small package. It’s a great camera for everyday use.

Konica III, Kentmere 100
Konica III, Kentmere 100

Of the new additions to the 35mm stable, the Konica III is perhaps the most capable. The lens is sharp in a modern way (it’s a Planar design) that is quite different from most of my cameras. The ergonomics are a little odd, given the downstroke film advance, but it handles reasonably well once you get used to it.

Rolleiflex Old Standard, Kodak Ektar
Rolleiflex Old Standard, Kodak Ektar

Perhaps the greatest revelation of 2013, however, was Your Humble Filmosaur’s first forays into medium format. Beginning with a Ciro-flex TLR and rapidly expanding into a variety of other MF options, the possibilities of such a large negative became quite compelling. The Rolleiflex I stumbled across in an antiques shop for a ridiculously low price really shows just how special MF photography can be.

Canon P, Canon 50/1.5, Kodak Gold 200
Canon P, Canon 50/1.5, Kodak Gold 200

But of course it’s not all about gear. I tried to work on technique as well, particularly when it comes to street photography, as I think that’s one of my weaker skills. My Midtown Manhattan in Sixteen Frames series, shot over a single weekend, represented what I felt was a pretty decent improvement over past efforts. There were other outings, however, that also yielded worthwhile shots.

Canon P, Canon 50/1.5, Kodak Portra 160
Canon P, Canon 50/1.5, Kodak Portra 160

The main problem with street photography is that you have to go where there are other people. People are often annoying; Your Humble Filmosaur generally prefers to avoid them. This leads me out into the woods, which, as it turns out, is a good place for photography as well. This fall didn’t look like it was going to be all that great for foliage, but it turned out better than expected.

Canon P, Jupiter-8 50/2, Kodak Portra 160
Canon P, Jupiter-8 50/2, Kodak Portra 160

Beyond local excursions, there was some travel as well. The big trip was to Europe for a few weeks, including one on a small private boat in the Adriatic. As mentioned, I settled on the Canon P kit without too much deliberation; choosing films was a bit more agonizing. Tri-X was the obvious choice for B&W, but color came down to Ektar or Portra 160. After probably far too much thinking about it, I ended up going with the latter. In retrospect, it was clearly the proper choice: Portra’s latitude and subdued colors were perfect, and knowing that I didn’t have to worry too much about nailing the exposure made shooting quickly that much easier.

Kodak Retina I, Kentmere 100
Kodak Retina I, Kentmere 100

Closer to home, I also spent a few days in Maine in the early summer. It was a fun little trip, but not a once-in-a-lifetime sort of thing. I had two folding cameras I was testing out; I didn’t really expect anything great out of them, but one – the Kodak Retina I – yielded what might just be my favorite photo of the year.

So that’s it, ladies and gentlemen – 2013 as documented by Your Humble Filmosaur. Stay tuned for another year’s worth of photographic experimentation and rambling, opinionated commentary. Or don’t. I’ll be here whether you like it or not.

Semi-Random Photo for 25 November 2013

After all that gritty urban black & white in my “Midtown Manhattan in Sixteen Frames” series, I figured it was time for some color.

Canon P, Nikkor Q.C. 135/3.5, Portra 160
Canon P, Nikkor Q.C. 135/3.5, Portra 160